Posts Tagged ‘toxic

07
Feb
12

In the Foothills

In Chicagoland, the major garbage range is formed by the Calumet Mountains. Very impressive, and I’ve written about them before in Connecting the Dots. But today I had reason to be in Dolton, Illinois, which doesn’t happen every day. Dolton lies in the foothills of the Calumets, south-south-west more or less.

View from Needles Park

Dolton is not exactly a metropolis. It has a 70s-style diner, a discount store, a Western Union, liquor stores and launderettes, miles of chain-link fence, smothered chicken at the Samichez take-out, lots of blowing trash, more than a fair share of resignation, and a highly unnatural stench in the raw air. And of course a very large pile of trash butting up to Cottage Grove Lake and the baseball diamond at Needles Park.

In his essay Disneyland with the Death Penalty, William Gibson says, “Ordinarily, confronted with a strange city, I look for the parts that have┬ábroken down and fallen apart, revealing the underlying social mechanisms; how the place is really wired beneath the lay of the land as presented by the Chamber of Commerce.” I get that. It feels as if far more is revealed in the rubble and dust than in the buff and polish of the showcase avenues. There’s the wear and tear of history, the stresses that spring from lived reality, the cracks that open under the weight of grief.

But what to make of a place where there is nothing but fracture? Where the Chamber of Commerce has lit out of town long ago and there is no lay of the land to look beneath? Where the wiring is kaput and the chemicals that make everywhere else so prosperous, shiny bright, and bug free are all on the surface–and in the air and the ground and the water?

What to do when understanding is not sufficient to the challenge on the ground?

28
Jul
08

Apocalypse

“The most concrete emblem of every economic cycle is the dump. Accumulating everything that ever was, dumps are the true aftermath of consumption, something more than the mark every product leaves on the surface of the earth. The south of Italy is the end of the line for the dregs of production, useless leftovers, and toxic waste. If all the trash that, according to the Italian environmental group Legambiente, escapes official inspection were collected in one place, it would form a mountain weighing 14 million tons and rising 47,900 feet from a base of three hectares. Mont Blanc rises 15,780 feet, Everest 29015. “

This is Roberto Saviano, in Gomorrah: A Personal Journey into the Violent International Empire of Naples’ Organized Crime System. Organized crime, it quickly becomes apparent from Saviano’s account of the havoc the Camorra wreaks on Campania, is a misnomer. “Organized” is really not the word for anarchy piled on top of blood thirst, outsize machismo married to insane greed, blinding pride, temper tantrums, and an endless supply of artillery.

But what is perhaps most instructive (and chilling) about Saviano’s story is how difficult it is to distinguish the various criminal endeavors of the Camorra from their business enterprises. Clearly, the crime bosses don’t make a distinction between business and crime–they just have a slightly more inventive way to get business done, a few more options when it comes to making themselves competitive. And that’s one reason why the trash business has been so attractive to them.

According to Saviano, the Camorra, which dominates the construction industry, routinely mixes toxic waste into cement and then builds apartments, offices, houses, schools with it.

The Camorra takes loads of toxic waste from the north (in return for payment), dumping it into the pits meant for the subsidized destruction of agricultural surpluses (and collecting the subsidies), and then selling the agricultural surpluses that didn’t actually end up in the pits.

Graves are turned every 40 years in Italy, apparently, and the Camorra accepts payment to dispose of the bodies and then dumps them into the fields around Caserta. Teenagers dig through the charnels in search of skulls to sell on flea markets.

And all of this in their own back yards. Any land not already used for some other purpose in the countryside around Naples is liable to be used to dump waste, without licenses or any kind of environmental provisions against leaching or outgassing. To reduce volume and allow for additional dumping, kids are paid to burn the accumulating mounds. When all the combustible matter is gone, houses are built on top and sold to low-income families below market.

In the meantime, all of the household waste from Naples and Campania now gets on the train to Germany.

It’s a frightening tale and hope in very short supply.




August 2017
M T W T F S S
« Dec    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031